Manufacturers are Liable for any Injury Caused by Their Drug

State and federal agencies help one another in ensuring the safety and well-being of all American citizens, especially in the area of healthcare. These agencies include:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which sees to the safety and effectiveness of drugs before approving these for patient use;

The Division of Medication Error Prevention and Analysis (DMEPA), the branch of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) that is tasked to appraise reports on errors involving generic, over-the-counter, prescription and other types of drugs; and,

The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) and the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), both of which work to minimize the risk of medication errors or ensure safety against medication errors.

Despite the standard pharmaceutical companies should comply with and the presence of these organizations, many kinds of drugs continue to cause adverse effects, harming patients rather than providing them the treatment they seek.

One of the possible reasons why some drugs turn out to be harmful is lack of proper tests on these. Before gaining approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, pharmaceutical companies should test their drugs to fully determine their effectivity and safety. However, since these companies sponsor the tests on their own drugs, some are able to conceal from the FDA unfavorable results and submit only results that show their drug’s safety and effectivity.

Hundreds of drugs have already been issued a black box warning by the FDA (this type of warning is the most serious warning the FDA issues). Many others have been recalled by the FDA or have voluntarily been recalled by their manufacturers – but not after these have already been linked to serious harm or patient death. Due to adverse effects, thousands of medical malpractice lawsuits against drug manufacturers have and continue to be filed in courts every year. In fact, many of these lawsuits have caused manufacturers millions of dollars in settlement claims.

In one website with address, https://www.zavodnicklaw.com/, there is an article that says, “Although pharmaceutical companies and drug manufacturers must undergo years of research and testing before their products reach consumers, unsafe drugs still find their way onto the market at alarming rates. Prescription and over-the-counter drugs frequently become available for consumption before their risks are properly understood, resulting in an increased health hazard that threatens public safety. Despite the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) mandatory regulations of drugs before they even hit the market, the availability of dangerous drugs remains prevalent.

Even worse, sometimes even if there is reliable proof that these dangerous drugs lead to serious medical complications, drug manufacturers will still market the drug and stifle warnings of its adverse effects to consumers. Dangerous drug lawyers believe deceiving consumers to make a profit is unconscionable, thus, they fight in behalf of those harmed to hold misleading drug manufacturers accountable for their personal injury.

A manufacturer is held liable for any injury caused by their drug, even if they were unaware of the drug’s danger. Some pharmaceutical products cause enough widespread injury that mass tort litigation is brought against responsible manufacturers.”

Depakote as a Possible Cause of Hydranencephaly

No specific study links Depakote to hydranencephaly. However, studies on the effects of valproic acid on the developing fetus strongly suggest that the drug may have caused at least some cases of hydranencephaly.

Hydranencephaly is a rare neural tube defect characterized by the absence of the cerebral hemispheres. In its place is a sac-like membrane containing cerebrospinal fluid. In most cases, the brain stem and basal ganglia are intact. Researchers believe that the condition develops when the fetal brain sustains damage after it has developed from blood flow interruption, resulting in cell death and the eventual resorption of necrotic tissue by the body. This may be due to a stroke, or the death of a twin in the womb. According to the website of Williams Kherkher, there is some speculation that Depakote may have something to do with it as mothers taking the drug since 1995 were unaware of the risks they were taking.

DNA damage to valproic acid exposure in utero is strongly indicated in a study on neural tube defects. Though this is mostly due to fetal exposure in the first trimester, it is possible that some children that managed to develop normally through their first trimester suffered a setback in the second and third trimester, at which point the developed brain is susceptible cell damage.

A majority of those with hydranencephaly do not survive their first year, although there are a few that do. The typical hydranencephalic baby looks just like any baby with a normally developed brain, and the condition may not be diagnosed for months, or misdiagnosed. As the baby grows, the symptoms of hydranencephaly may present as irritability, difficulty in sucking, and seizures. Many are visually and cognitively impaired, but most respond readily to stimuli.

Life care of a hydranencephalic child is challenging, but infinitely preferable to early death. If your child was born with a neural tube defect, it may be due to Depakote. Consult with an experienced dangerous drugs attorney in your area to learn more about Depakote and its side effects.

Methods of Taking Zofran

When prescribed Zofran, it is important to take it exactly as the doctor says. Williams Kherkher Zofran lawyers describe situations in which medicines like Zofran are useful; when patients experience nausea and vomiting as a result of chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery, Zofran can help. There are three ways to taking Zofran, including regular tablets, orally disintegrating tablets, and oral soluble film strips. A patient’s type of usage depends on doctor’s discretion, and each method is unique with guidelines on proper instructions of consumption.

There are two types of Zofran tablets: regular and orally disintegrating. While patients can take regular tablets with or without a full stomach, they should always be combined with a glass of water. Orally disintegrating tablets have more extensive instructions, and the mouth may perceive this type of tablet as somewhat foreign.

Orally disintegrating tablets should be kept in the pack until use. When prying the tablet out of the package, it is important to peel back the foil rather than push the tablet through. Then, the tablet is placed on the tongue whereupon it begins to dissolve. Patients can swallow throughout the process (without swallowing the tablet itself), or once the tablet is completely dissolved. Afterwards, the patient can drink a glass of water. Similar to orally disintegrating tablets are oral soluble films.These are ingested similarly to orally disintegrating tablets, with the only difference being film vs. tablet.

Lastly, Zofran can come in liquid form. This type of Zofran should be measured and taken with precise precautions, being sure to follow the doctor’s orders. Measuring with a medical dose-measuring item rather than a cooking table spoon will increase accuracy. These dose-measuring items are advisable to when taking the liquid form so no under-doses or overdoses are taken.

Each method of Zofran consumption relieves a patient of nausea and vomiting, however has to be under the correct circumstances to prevent potential problems from arising. A patient’s type of usage depends on doctor’s discretion, and each method is unique with guidelines on proper instructions of consumption that should be followed directly.

What’s with Dangerous Pharmaceutical Products?

Hardly a day goes by that there isn’t something in the news about dangerous pharmaceutical products being developed, being approved for this or that condition, indicated in serious side effects, allegedly caused the death of patients, under review, recalled, under litigation, and so on and so forth. It is a wonder that these drugs are still in the market, but strangely enough the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) even expands the use of some dangerous drug that is currently under litigation. The press announcement comes with the appropriate warning, but still….

Drug companies make a lot of money from prescription drugs, which explain why they keep pushing them even if they may be dangerous, and even if they have to settle lawsuits for it. Patients often have little choice in the matter because the benefits of these drugs are believed to outweigh their drawbacks. Physicians rely on the literature that come with these drugs to make their judgment calls, which is why drug manufacturers often get into legal trouble when they fail to adequately warn the public about the risks of side effects, such as in a lawsuit.

According to the website of law firm Williams Kherkher, the FDA issues warnings about such side effects, but unfortunately this often happens after a significant number of complaints have been filed for a specific drugs, such as anti-epileptic medication Topamax. By then, it is too late for the victims. They do have recourse to litigation, but it would be much better if the focus was on prevention rather than compensation.

In the real world, compensation is typically the only recourse when it comes to dangerous pharmaceutical products. If you have sustained serious injury because of undisclosed risks or defective formula of a prescription drug, you need to consult with a product liability lawyer in your area.